Chilean and Colombian Armies Agree to Collaborate on Personnel Training

first_imgBy Dialogo May 23, 2012 In Bogotá on an official visit to Colombia, the commander-in-chief of the Chilean Army, General Juan Miguel Fuente-Alba, discussed with his counterpart Sergio Mantilla the advantages of intensifying the exchange of existing experiences in areas of mutual interest, such as the professional development of their personnel in the areas of education, instruction and training, comparing planning procedures, and unit utilization in the event of emergencies and natural disasters. On this occasion, Fuente-Alba requested cooperation from General Sergio Mantilla for the training of helicopter pilots, while offering the South American country slots for training Colombian personnel at the Chilean Army’s High Mountain School. During his six-day visit from May 14 to 19, General Fuente-Alba visited Larandia Military Fort, the 25th Aviation Brigade, and the National Training Center, a unit located at Tolemaida Military Fort and responsible for training career soldiers and members of Special Forces, paratroopers, and mountain units. In recognition of his contribution to rapprochement and collaboration with the Colombian Military, the Chilean commander received the José María Córdoba Order of Military Merit in the grade of Grand Cross.last_img read more


Brazil to Perform Massive Operation before Confederations Cup

first_imgBy Dialogo December 20, 2012 Brazil will deploy one of its biggest military operations for border control before the Confederations Cup soccer tournament in June 2013, which will be followed by the World Cup in 2014, Minister of Defense Celso Amorim announced on December 18. The deployment will involve about 20,000 members of the Navy, the Army and the Air Force, twice the staff used in the previous six editions of the so-called Operation Ágata. The operation will take place “before the Confederations Cup starts, so it won’t interfere with the influx of tourists” attending the tournament, Amorim said in a statement. Considered a rehearsal before the 2014 World Cup, the Confederations Cup will have the participation of eight continental champion soccer teams between June 15 and 30, in six of the 12 stadiums slated for the World Cup. The troops will be mobilized in several locations along Brazil’s extensive land border to control drug and weapons’ trafficking, as well as the smuggling of goods. The new edition of “Operation Ágata,” prior editions of which facilitated the seizure of almost 20 tons of explosives and 11 tons of narcotics, will have “mainly deterrent goals,” Amorim added. Tens of tons of other materials have been seized in police operations to support the military. “Operation Ágata” is part of a strategic border security plan announced by President Dilma Rousseff in June 2011. Brazil shares a border of about 16,000 kilometers, of which 9,000 kilometers are riverside territory with Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Surinam, Uruguay, Venezuela, and French Guiana. It represents a good test for the preparedness or not of the Brazilian organizaers for the upcoming World Cup.last_img read more


Honduras: Air Force authorized to down suspected drug planes

first_img TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras – Honduras’ Congress has passed a law authorizing the Air Force to shoot down unidentified planes suspected of carrying drugs over the Central American country, legislators said. The legislature voted overwhelmingly on the night of Jan. 17 to pass the “Air Space Protection Law” even though Honduras is a signatory of an international treaty that forbids downing of civilian aircraft, Congressional Vice President Marvin Ponce said. Ponce said the law authorizes planes to be shot down if they fail to file flight plans or abide by civil aviation rules. Defense Minister Marlon Pascua, in an interview with the newspaper La Tribuna, said Honduran authorities have cut the movement of drugs through its territory by 74% since mid-2010. [AFP (Honduras), 18/01/2014; El Heraldo (Honduras), 19/01/2014; La Tribuna (Honduras), 18/01/2014] By Dialogo January 21, 2014last_img read more


Joint Task Force-Bravo Assists Honduran Families in Remote Areas

first_imgBy Dialogo April 07, 2015 “The chaplain’s office worked together with JTF-Bravo’s intelligence office and civil and Military operations office, along with Joint Security Forces and the 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment Unit Ministry Team to scope out and select a village,” said U.S. Air Force Captain Samuel McClellan, JTF-Bravo command chaplain. Participants in the 59th Chapel Hike — a longstanding tradition of delivering supplies to underserviced communities in the mountains — departed on February 28 for an 11-kilometer round-trip hike to the remote communities of La Brea and La Laguna, both in the Department of Comayagua. There, they delivered more than 2,040 kilograms of food to Hondurans in need. Collecting donations, buying the food, and delivering it requires a high degree of planning and coordination. Just before Service Members distributed the food, the community representative of La Laguna, María Pinera, expressed her gratitude to the volunteers of JTF-Bravo. “Humanitarian aid allows the Armed Forces to maintain a social bond with the more vulnerable communities,” said Eugenio Sosa, a security analyst at the National Autonomous University of Honduras (UNAH). “In the communities, activities of this type are widely accepted. The residents have great admiration for the Honduran Armed Forces and JTF-Bravo due to the efforts of both institutions to help them.” Currently, JTF-Bravo’s Medical Element has two full-service visits scheduled for 2015. First, the Medical Element plans to support a Honduran-led Medical Partnership Exercise in Comayagua Central Parque on June 6. In addition, there will be a two-day Medical Readiness Training Exercise outside Comayagua, scheduled for June 24-25. “Humanitarian aid allows the Armed Forces to maintain a social bond with the more vulnerable communities,” said Eugenio Sosa, a security analyst at the National Autonomous University of Honduras (UNAH). “In the communities, activities of this type are widely accepted. The residents have great admiration for the Honduran Armed Forces and JTF-Bravo due to the efforts of both institutions to help them.” The task force’s primary mission is to encourage unity and conduct and support joint operations, actions, and activities in the joint operations area in order to provide security, stability, and regional cooperation. After delivering the provisions, the members of JTF-Bravo spent time interacting with the residents and playing with the children, who broke open three piñatas the volunteers donated. Also donated were 24 soccer balls by the Kick for Nick Foundation, a non-profit named after the late Private Nick Madaras that fulfills his dream of U.S. Troops giving soccer balls to children overseas. After delivering the provisions, the members of JTF-Bravo spent time interacting with the residents and playing with the children, who broke open three piñatas the volunteers donated. Also donated were 24 soccer balls by the Kick for Nick Foundation, a non-profit named after the late Private Nick Madaras that fulfills his dream of U.S. Troops giving soccer balls to children overseas. But the hard work pays off when Service Members demonstrate their commitment to helping the civilian population. Just before Service Members distributed the food, the community representative of La Laguna, María Pinera, expressed her gratitude to the volunteers of JTF-Bravo. “In addition, we worked with the governor of Comayagua [Ana Valenzuela] since she wanted to support La Brea and donate 65 bags of food she acquired from the Permanent Contingency Commission (COPECO) [the Honduran equivalent of FEMA in the U.S.]” In addition to providing food, JTF-Bravo Service Members also provide medical care to the people of Comayagua on an annual basis. “Every year we carry out strategic planning with the members of JTF-Bravo, not only for this hike, which is also known as the ‘Hike of Love,’ but also to plan for health issues,” Governor Valenzuela said. “Our friends, our neighbors are visiting us today, but they are not coming empty handed. They are here with nutrition for the people,” Pinera said. Since the tradition began in 2004, about 9,800 service members have donated more than $173,800 and delivered more than 214,000 pounds of food to villages. It’s not an easy journey; the homes are difficult to reach by vehicle, and for more than 5.6 kilometers, each member of the Joint Task Force climbed more than 457 meters of mountainous terrain with nine kilograms of food in their packs. JTF-Bravo is one of three joint task forces operating under the United States Southern Command (SOUTHCOM). JTF-Bravo manages a runway that can handle C-5 aircraft, the largest airplane flown by the U.S. Air Force, according to the JTF-Bravo website. More than 170 members of Joint Task Force Bravo (JTF-Bravo), which operates out of the Soto Cano Air Base in Honduras, recently delivered humanitarian aid to 230 families in need. More than 170 members of Joint Task Force Bravo (JTF-Bravo), which operates out of the Soto Cano Air Base in Honduras, recently delivered humanitarian aid to 230 families in need. Many of the children also filled their hands, pockets, and shirts with sweets that JTF-Bravo Service Members gave them as gifts. JTF-Bravo recently supported the “Better Life through Health” fair by supporting the Ministry of Health’s efforts in handling all of the medical and logistical aspects, in the central square of Comayagua. Participants in the 59th Chapel Hike — a longstanding tradition of delivering supplies to underserviced communities in the mountains — departed on February 28 for an 11-kilometer round-trip hike to the remote communities of La Brea and La Laguna, both in the Department of Comayagua. There, they delivered more than 2,040 kilograms of food to Hondurans in need. Since the tradition began in 2004, about 9,800 service members have donated more than $173,800 and delivered more than 214,000 pounds of food to villages. It’s not an easy journey; the homes are difficult to reach by vehicle, and for more than 5.6 kilometers, each member of the Joint Task Force climbed more than 457 meters of mountainous terrain with nine kilograms of food in their packs. JTF-Bravo also provides medical care Hike requires extensive coordination Many of the children also filled their hands, pockets, and shirts with sweets that JTF-Bravo Service Members gave them as gifts. JTF-Bravo is one of three joint task forces operating under the United States Southern Command (SOUTHCOM). JTF-Bravo manages a runway that can handle C-5 aircraft, the largest airplane flown by the U.S. Air Force, according to the JTF-Bravo website. “The chaplain’s office worked together with JTF-Bravo’s intelligence office and civil and Military operations office, along with Joint Security Forces and the 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment Unit Ministry Team to scope out and select a village,” said U.S. Air Force Captain Samuel McClellan, JTF-Bravo command chaplain. But the hard work pays off when Service Members demonstrate their commitment to helping the civilian population. JTF-Bravo also provides medical care “Our friends, our neighbors are visiting us today, but they are not coming empty handed. They are here with nutrition for the people,” Pinera said. Collecting donations, buying the food, and delivering it requires a high degree of planning and coordination. The task force’s primary mission is to encourage unity and conduct and support joint operations, actions, and activities in the joint operations area in order to provide security, stability, and regional cooperation. Hike requires extensive coordination Currently, JTF-Bravo’s Medical Element has two full-service visits scheduled for 2015. First, the Medical Element plans to support a Honduran-led Medical Partnership Exercise in Comayagua Central Parque on June 6. In addition, there will be a two-day Medical Readiness Training Exercise outside Comayagua, scheduled for June 24-25. “In addition, we worked with the governor of Comayagua [Ana Valenzuela] since she wanted to support La Brea and donate 65 bags of food she acquired from the Permanent Contingency Commission (COPECO) [the Honduran equivalent of FEMA in the U.S.]” In addition to providing food, JTF-Bravo Service Members also provide medical care to the people of Comayagua on an annual basis. JTF-Bravo recently supported the “Better Life through Health” fair by supporting the Ministry of Health’s efforts in handling all of the medical and logistical aspects, in the central square of Comayagua. “Every year we carry out strategic planning with the members of JTF-Bravo, not only for this hike, which is also known as the ‘Hike of Love,’ but also to plan for health issues,” Governor Valenzuela said. “The relationship between Honduras and Joint Task Force-Bravo is a good strategic alliance,” Valenzuela said. “Last year they met with all 18 Honduran governors from across the country so that they could learn more about the work and the strength of JTF-Bravo.” “The relationship between Honduras and Joint Task Force-Bravo is a good strategic alliance,” Valenzuela said. “Last year they met with all 18 Honduran governors from across the country so that they could learn more about the work and the strength of JTF-Bravo.”last_img read more


First Operations Security Course Taught in Colombia

first_img“The OPSEC course essentially helped me to distinguish and differentiate between the procedures and protocols regarding classified information and sensitive/unclassified information that is still relevant to the mission, and also to protect our families’ information,” said Sergeant Jairo Florez, from the Special Operations Joint Command (CCOES per its Spanish acronym), who participated in the course. By Dialogo October 05, 2015 It’s important to prepare our armed forces for their military and personal future. The course was held August 10-15 at the Army Intelligence and Counterintelligence School in Bogotá with the assistance of two experts in Operations Security from SOUTHCOM and representatives from Information Operations at the U.S. Embassy Military Group in Colombia working in coordination with the Counterintelligence Office and the office of the Chief of Joint Integrated Actions at the General Command for the Armed Forces of Colombia. This first course, which was attended by 40 participants, including officers and NCOs from the Navy, Air Force and Army, was taught primarily by Counterintelligence and Integrated Actions experts at the joint actions level, because the Colombian Military needs to grow its capabilities in OPSEC that do not fall solely under intelligence, but that also creates a synergy that allows counterparts to work together at the operational and strategic levels (J2, J3 y J5). As part of the support plan the United States Southern Command maintains with Colombia on Integrated Actions, Bogotá hosted its first basic and intermediate course in Operations Security (OPSEC) with the support of the SOUTHCOM Information Operations Office (J39). Their goal, during the six day course, was to establish mechanisms to raise organizational awareness about information security — not only information that is classified or secret, but information considered to be mission critical for the Military’s operational missions — in addition to protecting the personal and family information of military and civilian personnel. Its importance lies in the fact that the students were specially selected so that they would spread their knowledge about OPSEC within their respective branches and offices, and so they might possibly become program directors within their units and contribute significantly to the creation, design and implementation of doctrine in this subject. In addition, the knowledge the students have in operations and tactical subjects serves as an example of battlefield experience and allows them to provide guidance in the process of establishing an OPSEC culture. The military units are already using the lessons learned at the Colombian course to hold internal training sessions. CCOES and the International Missions and Integrated Actions School (ESMAI per its Spanish acronyms) are the two units providing general knowledge, introductory courses on OPSEC. Those same offices hope to expand implementation of a formal awareness campaign through informational material that would be delivered to members of different military units and the Colombian Ministry of National Defense beginning in February 2016.last_img read more


Uruguayan Air Force Conducts Exercises to Counter Transnational Crime

first_imgOn May 18th, the High Command sent instructions via the Aerial Operations Center to operate select reconnaissance flights in precise locations, which were given using coordinates. The operation was meant to disrupt the plan that the crews already had in place. The exercise tested the unit’s youngest pilots, who received logistical support by the Air Base Squadron from the 3rd Air Brigade. The National Aerial Police secured the airport. By Dialogo June 07, 2016 Narco-traffickers exploit Uruguay Uruguay’s Air Force (FAU) recently deployed 25 pilots and another 15 service members to the country’s northern region to search for illegal landing strips used by drug traffickers. The training strengthens airspace security, the country’s fight against drug trafficking, and the air squadron’s operational capacities. In addition to participating in aircraft interception operations, the 7th Air Squadron also conducts transfers of personnel, rescues, and humanitarian aid, as it depends on more than 50 aviators from all ranks with various levels of experience and training. “Since flight is our vocation and expectations center on a professional level, we must provide our crews clear ways to satisfactorily complete assignments that are not planned and in which one has to adjust and adapt,” Major Ocampo stated. Pilots log 50 hours of flight “What has been planned are territorial deployments in different parts of the country, spread out in such a way that the entire country is covered in order to protect Uruguayan airspace,” Major Ocampo explained. “Even beyond having professional training sessions, the fortification of each one of the squadron’s members is very important. Experience is very valuable, and the main thing is for them to be able to turn that experience onto those who come after them as well as on missions.” Pilots and navigators from the 7th Air Squadron (Observation and Liaison), which belongs to the FAU’s 3rd Air Brigade, departed in four Cessna C-206 H Stationair airplanes and a Beechcraft UB-55 Baron aircraft on May 17th toward Melo, the department capital of Cerro Largo, near the border with Brazil. The main objective of the deployment, which concluded on May 20th, was to look for landing strips, observe the dry border, control the air space, and evaluate the flight squadron’s capabilities – both in terms of crews’ operational plans and logistical support in an irregular environment, according to an FAU press release. center_img During night maneuvers, they used “beacons that ran on photo cells,” which lit up at night after being charged with sunlight. “One of the aims of the night flights is to be up to date in order to support the interception of illegal aircraft when so ordered by higher ups,” Major Ocampo explained. “This deployment is part of the training that a flight crew that flies in this squadron must have. The pilots are equipped with practice and training in how to combat drug trafficking and transnational crime organizations. One of our main missions is to provide support to organizations which are fully engaged in the fight against crime and drug trafficking.” “The Uruguayan officers have strengthened their ties of cooperation and teamwork, putting the accomplishment of their missions before all else,” Major Ocampo stated. One hundred thirty-five kilograms of cocaine were seized in Uruguay from January to May of this year, following 1.5 tons seized in 2013 compared to just 10 kilograms of the drug being confiscated in 1991, the newspaper El Observador reported . Conversely, the International Narcotics Control Board has reported Uruguay has the third highest rate of cocaine consumption in South America, bested only by Chile and Argentina. The next training sessions, which are planned a year in advance, will be held in September and November. “The primary challenges that the 7th Air Squadron’s members are facing are being able to complete missions satisfactorily, especially those that remove them from normal operational environments, and being able to overcome weather while operating safely,” Aviator Major Juan Ocampo, Commander of the 7th Air Squadron, told Diálogo. Uruguay is not a country that produces important narcotics, according to the U.S. government. However, international narcotrafficking groups take advantage of the country’s porous borders with Brazil and Argentina. Traffickers use the Uruguayan capital of Montevideo as a hub to transport cocaine that’s produced in the Andes, the website Espectador reported on March 2nd. During the training, in which pilots logged 50 hours in the air, the Uruguayan service members conducted day and night reconnaissance as well as night landings in unusual settings such as mountains, forests, and other areas that have been hard to reach for authorities in the fight against transnational threats. last_img read more


Board honors Jax’s Schmidt

first_imgBoard honors Jax’s Schmidt March 1, 2002 Regular News Board honors Jax’s SchmidtJacksonville attorney Terrance E. Schmidt has received a commendation from the Bar Board of Governors for his work assisting the Bar in the disciplinary prosecution of F. Lee Bailey.Schmidt acted as special counsel assisting Bar staff in the protracted and high profile case that wound up with Bailey being disbarred late last year. The board passed the resolution unanimously at its February 1 meeting.The board’s resolution notes that Schmidt and his firm, Bledsoe, Schmidt, Lippes, et al. , donated more than $50,000 of Schmidt’s services in the Bailey case. It also said that Schmidt “by his pro bono service has epitomized the ideal of service for the public good and exemplified the concept of professionalism.”The resolution declared that Schmidt “is commended, praised, and thanked for his selfless service, counsel, and advice to The Florida Bar and for his commitment to the maintenance of the highest ideals of professionalism to which all members of The Florida Bar should aspire.”last_img read more


In Memoriam

first_imgIn Memoriam April 15, 2003 Regular News Peter Joseph Giacoma, Jr., Plantation Admitted 1980; Died January 17, 2003 Bruce Roger Lieberman, Delray Beach Admitted 1997; Died July 21, 2002 Felix Rivera Lujan, San Juan, PR Admitted 1952; Died October 6, 2000 L. Thomas McAnnally, Green Cove Springs Admitted 1971; Died October 13, 2002 Jerry R. Parker, Tampa Admitted 1972; Died January 11, 2003 David F. Patterson, St. Petersburg Admitted 1964; Died December 6, 2002 Raymond L. Potts, Orlando Admitted 1994; Died August 27, 2001 Albert Nissen Proujansky, Boynton Beach Admitted 1983; Died December 21, 2002 Jeffrey W. Reinen, Brookfield, CT Admitted 1975; Died Novebmer 22, 2000 Fred Marshall Spitz, Miami Admitted 1969; Died August 29, 2002 Luther M. Taylor, Palm Beach Gardens Admitted 1964; Died December 12, 2002 Thomas Finley Woods, Tallahassee Admitted 1963; Died August 13, 2000last_img read more


Anstead: Court funding moving in the right direction

first_img Anstead: Court funding moving in the right direction Senior EditorA potentially troublesome concept for revamping the courts that was floated in the Florida House has been dramatically changed for the better, but lawyers still need to be vigilant in the closing days of the legislature, according to Supreme Court Chief Justice Harry Lee Anstead.Anstead addressed the Bar Board of Governors earlier this month about legislative efforts to deal with Revision 7 to the Florida Constitution. That 1998 voter-approved amendment mandates that the state assume from counties a larger share of operational funding for trial courts by July 1, 2004.His impassioned speech sparked a standing ovation from the board, which also approved a recommendation from the Communications Committee to set up a special committee to educate the public about Article V issues.“The [House] legislative committee yesterday released [its proposed] legislation that, I can tell you, I’m very appreciative of. It has moved in the right direction toward the position that was taken by the Senate,” Anstead told the board. “There is some movement, and that movement would have not occurred without the help of all of you and the lawyers you represent back in the home communities.. . . “I’m pleased. And I’m optimistic. Well, I can’t afford to be optimistic,” he added, noting there could be more changes as House and Senate representatives work out differences in a conference committee.“Keep your eye on the ball for the entire ball game. We cannot afford to not leave everything out there on the playing field if we are going to preserve Florida’s court system in the next two years,” he said. “We are now moving in the right direction this year, but this is crunch time.”Anstead recounted that he had visited 15 newspaper editorial boards, and most followed up with editorials supporting the court system. And he said Senate leaders worked closely with the courts to carry out their interpretation of Revision 7.He also recounted the history of the funding issue. It began in 1972, he said, when the unified state court system was approved by voters, doing away with municipal and local courts. The agreement was the state would fund the entire court system, but that never happened. Counties found themselves paying a high proportion of court costs, a bill that became more costly as county revenues became increasingly strained.In 1997, the Constitution Revision Commission approved as part of its recommendations an amendment mandating the state take over more of the court system funding, and specifying how that would be done. Former Chief Justice Alan Sundberg played a major role in drafting the amendment, Anstead said, and also an explanatory statement from the CRC that the amendment was intended to be a straight, simple funding transfer. The CRC also built in a six-year window, so the switch could be accomplished in steps.But because of budget concerns in past years, little was done, leaving a compressed two-year time frame to figure out exactly what costs the state would pick up and where the money was coming from. Initial ideas during the 2003 session, he said, would have left Sundberg spinning in his grave.Even members of the House committee said they didn’t know where some of the lower chamber’s initial ideas came from or who was backing them, Anstead said. But representatives also noted those were only ideas and general concepts, and were never drafted into an actual bill.Thanks to continued efforts from judges, the Bar, lawyers, and others, the bill finally presented to the House Select Committee on Article V was much improved from some of the initial concepts.And the courts were able to determine that the actual cost to the state for the judicial part of Revision 7 would be $190 million, unlike some estimates that ranged up to $500 million or more.While the Revision 7 issues have been and will continue to be challenging, board members are lucky they have a chance to make such a positive contribution, Anstead said.“How many people are actually privileged to be there at a time of crisis in our society and can get in on it and preserve or make better a value in our country?” he asked. “And that value is our form of government, and that is what is being threatened.”He quoted Shakespeare from Henry II and a comment on the Battle of Hastings, which shaped English history: “Old men will weep that they weren’t there that day.”Board member David Welch, chair of the Communications Committee, said that the committee approved a recommendation from board member Ervin Gonzalez to create a task force to educate the public about the importance of providing adequate funding for the courts.“We’ve got to take charge and go forward and make whatever efforts are needed to coordinate the message with the Supreme Court,” Gonzalez said. “If we don’t do this, if we don’t have a good plan, we should plan to fail and lose the judiciary as we know it. No one is as well suited to take on this issue as The Florida Bar.”Added Welch: “It will be a Florida Bar task force to ensure proper implementation of Revision 7.”He and others said details about what the task force will do still have to be worked out. Board member Chobee Ebbets, a member of the Communications Committee, said there should be a member from each circuit, and the panel should focus on getting word out at the circuit level and to local lawyers.“The desire of many members on the Communications Committee is exactly what Mr. Ebbets said, to provide greater resources to our circuits around the state,” said board member Jennifer Coberly. “We very, very strongly agree with what the chief justice said today. It is time for the Bar to step up today.”The board approved the recommendation unanimously. April 30, 2003 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular News Anstead: Court funding moving in the right directionlast_img read more


1-800-PIT-BULL is for real

first_imgIn Rep. David Simmons’s crusade to restrict what he sees as bad lawyer advertising, the example he mentions over and over is the law firm using the phone number 1-800-PIT- BULL.It has become almost the apocryphal example of what many see as ads that provoke public hostility toward the profession and the legal system. So apocryphal, that attorney John Morgan, in a June 30 debate with Simmons in Orlando, questioned whether it was real.He offered to bet Simmons $1,000, with the loser contributing to the winner’s favorite charity, if Simmons could find a lawyer ad using the PIT BULL number.Hope Morgan’s checkbook was handy. Simmons noted all anyone has to do is dial the number and that the Ft. Lauderdale Sun Sentinel had written about the phone number. Although Simmons didn’t mention it, there is also a pending Bar grievance case against the firm, partly over the use of that phone number.A quick search on the Web also showed that the Miami Herald has also written about Pape & Chandler, P.A., of Ft. Lauderdale. And the firm’s Web site offers to sell T-shirts and hats with their pit bull logo and distinctive phone number.The ad has an interesting history with the Bar. The firm initially submitted a transcript of its TV ads, but not a videotape. The transcript noted that the ad would have an 800 number and logo, but didn’t said the logo would be a pit bull and that the number would be 1-800-PIT-BULL. The firm was given a preliminary approval of the ad, with the caveat that a final approval would not be given until the videotape was filed with the Bar, which it never was.That led to review by the local grievance committee after the ad was aired. That committee dismissed the case with a letter of advisement to the firm.But then the Bar’s Statewide Grievance Committee, which handles violation of the Bar’s ad rules, took up the case after former Bar President Tod Aronovitz, acting as an individual attorney, filed a complaint shortly before he took office in June 1992. Another Bar member also complained. Last September, the committee found probable cause and in February the case was referred to a referee. In May the firm filed affirmative defenses and asked that the charges be dismissed.According to Tony Boggs, the complaint alleges that the firm’s ad, including the use of the pit bull phone number improperly characterizes the firm’s legal services, can create unjustified expectations about the firm’s services, and could be misleading and manipulative.In its motion, the firm said the Bar is prohibited from acting by the initial grievance committee’s dismissal and letter, that the ad is protected by the First Amendment, and that the Bar’s actions do not follow rulings from the U.S. Supreme Court on lawyer advertising, among other reasons. August 1, 2004 Regular News 1-800-PIT-BULL is for realcenter_img 1-800-PITBULL is for reallast_img read more